Best 33 Water Sports Types

Water Sports is a sport played or practiced on or in water. Here we’ve rounded up all types of water sports.

Types of Water Sports

  1. Surfing
  2. Sailing
  3. Swimming
  4. Wind Surfing
  5. Jet Skiing
  6. Wake Boarding
  7. Water Skiing
  8. Kite Surfing
  9. Skimboarding
  10. Bodyboarding
  11. Cliff Diving
  12. Scuba Diving
  13. Synchronized Swimming
  14. Synchronized Diving
  15. Triathlon
  16. Water Polo
  17. Aquajogging
  18. Barefoot SKiing
  19. Canoeing
  20. Dragon Boat Racing
  21. Flyboard
  22. Flowboarding
  23. Kayaking
  24. Kneeboarding
  25. Paddleboarding
  26. Parasailing
  27. Rafting
  28. Yachting
  29. Cave Diving
  30. Ice Diving
  31. Powerboating
  32. Snorkeling
  33. Spearfishing

1. Surfing

Surfing is a water sport that involves riding breaking waves to shore in an upright or prone position using an equipement called surfboard. Surfers catch ocean, river, or man-made waves, and glide across the surface of the water until the wave breaks and loses its energy.

2. Sailing

Sailing specifically refers to the sport of using wind to power sails and propel the boat forward (rather than engines) on the surface of the water, on ice or on land over a chosen course, which is often part of a larger plan of navigation. A course defined with respect to the true wind direction is called a point of sail.

3. Swimming

Swimming is an individual or team sport that involves using arms and legs to move the body through water. Typically, swimming takes place in pools or in open water (e.g., in a sea or lake). Swimming is a sport that tests your fitness and stamina.

4. Wind Surfing

Wind Surfing combines elements of surfing and sailing. The equipment used here is a surfboard with a sail fixed on a movable mast. The surfer has to move with the waves to control the board and at the same time manage the sail according to the winds.

5. Jet Skiing

Jet ski is a small machine like a motorcycle that is powered by a jet engine and can travel on the surface of water.

6. Wake Boarding

Imagine surfing while being towed along by a high-speed boat. That’s wakeboarding in a nutshell. Wake Boarding involves riding a wakeboard over the surface of a body of water. It was developed from a combination of water skiing, snowboarding, and surfing techniques. Also, called as Cable Wakeboarding.

7. Water Skiing

Water skiing is a surface water sport in which an individual is pulled behind a boat or a cable ski installation over a body of water. Also, called as Cable Skiing.

8. Kite Surfing

Kitesurfing uses a small surfboard or wakeboard which is pulled by a kite. You will need to go through some training in order to understand the movement and direction control of the kite. Also, called as Kite Boarding or Sky Boarding.

9. Skimboarding

Skimboarding is a sport similar to surfing which takes place near the shore. Skimboarding is a boardsport in which a skimboard (much like a surfboard but smaller and without fins) is used to glide across the water’s surface to meet an incoming breaking wave, and ride it back to shore. Also, called as Skimming.

10. Bodyboarding

Bodyboarding is a water sport in which the surfer rides a bodyboard on the crest, face, and curl of a wave which is carrying the surfer towards the shore. Bodyboarders typically use swim fins for additional propulsion and control while riding a breaking wave. Bodyboarding is the art of riding waves in a prone position. Also, called as Boogieboarding.

11. Cliff Diving

Cliff diving is probably the least complicated extreme sport. There’s no equipment to buy, no special clothing to wear and no provider services to hire. It’s just your body, sailing through the air from dizzying heights and plunging into a body of water below. Think of jumping off an eight-story building.

12. Scuba Diving

People have been longing to discover what lies deep beneath the sea. Scuba diving makes this possible by allowing people to swim underwater without needing to hold one’s breath. The diver uses a self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) which is completely independent of surface supply, to breathe underwater.

13. Synchronized Swimming

Synchronized swimming is a hybrid form of swimming, dance, and gymnastics, consisting of swimmers (either solos, duets, trios, combos, or teams) performing a synchronized routine of elaborate moves in the water, accompanied by music. Synchronized swimming demands advanced water skills, and requires great strength, endurance, flexibility, grace, artistry and precise timing, as well as exceptional breath control when upside down underwater. During routines, swimmers are required to not touch the bottom of the pool.

14. Synchronized Diving

Synchronized diving is a diving sport in which two divers perform the exact same dive simultaneously. It can be done solo or synchronized, where 2 divers must mimic or perform opposite diving forms, while diving simultaneously.

15. Triathlon

A triathlon is a multiple-stage competition involving the completion of three continuous and sequential endurance disciplines. It involves swimming, cycling, and running various distances in immediate succession.

16. Water Polo

Water polo, sport played in a swimming pool by teams of seven with a buoyant ball resembling an association football (soccer ball). The game was originally called “football-in-the-water,” and indeed it is more like association football and basketball than polo.

17. Aquajogging

Aquajogging involves wearing a flotation device around your middle and then moving your arms and legs in a running motion in the deep end of the pool. Your feet should not touch the floor of the pool and you should make slow forward progress. It is probably the most common form of cross-training among elite athletes. Also, called as Deepwater running.

18. Barefoot Skiing

Barefoot waterskiing is one of the most intimidating and rewarding water sports in practice today. These skiers travel at high speeds on just the skin on their feet! To some this is appealing; however, due to the mental obstacles barefooting brings, many beginners can be discouraged.

19. Canoeing

Canoeing is a sport which involves paddling a canoe with a single-bladed paddle.

20. Dragon Boat Racing

Dragon boat racing is the most popular activity during the Dragon Boat Festival. A dragon boat is a human-powered wooden watercraft. It is shaped and decorated in the form of a Chinese dragon. Dragon boats vary in size by region, and the crew numbers change accordingly. Generally it is about 20–35 meters in length, and it needs 30–60 people to paddle it. Also, called as Rowing.

21. Flyboard

A Flyboard is a brand of hydroflighting device which supplies propulsion to drive the Flyboard into the air to perform a sport known as hydroflying.
A Flyboard rider stands on a board connected by a long hose to a watercraft. Water is forced under pressure to a pair of boots with jet nozzles underneath which provide thrust for the rider to fly up to 15 m (49 ft) in the air or to dive headlong through the water down to 2.5 m (8 ft).

22. Flowboard

Flowboarding is an alternative boardsport incorporating elements of surfing, bodyboarding, skateboarding, skimboarding, snowboarding and wakeboarding. Flowriders ride on artificial waves that are technically called “sheet waves”. Also, called as Flowriding.

23. Kayaking

Kayaking is the use of a kayak for moving across water. It is distinguished from canoeing by the sitting position of the paddler and the number of blades on the paddle. Most kayaks have closed decks, although sit-on-top and inflatable kayaks are growing in popularity as well.

24. Kneeboarding

Kneeboarding is a water sport where the rider is towed at planing speed behind a motorboat on a hydrodynamically-shaped board. Unlike water skiing and wakeboarding, kneeboarders enjoy a much lower centre of gravity, making balancing much easier, and making the falls often less painful. Also, called as Towsport.

25. Paddleboarding

Paddleboarding participants are propelled by a swimming motion using their arms while lying, kneeling, or standing on a paddleboard or surfboard in the ocean. This article refers to traditional prone or kneeling paddleboarding. A derivative of paddleboarding is stand up paddle surfing and stand up paddleboarding. Paddleboarding is usually performed in the open ocean, with the participant paddling and surfing unbroken swells to cross between islands or journey from one coastal area to another.

26. Parasailing

In Parasailing, a person is towed behind a vehicle (usually a boat) while attached to a specially designed canopy wing that reminds one of a parachute, known as a parasail wing. The manned kite’s moving anchor may be a car, truck, or boat. The harness attaches the pilot to the parasail, which is connected to the boat, or land vehicle, by the tow rope. The vehicle then drives off, carrying the parascender (or wing) and person into the air. If the boat is powerful enough, two or three people can parasail behind it at the same time. The parascender has little or no control over the parachute. Also, called as Parascending or Parakiting.

27. Rafting

Rafting is a sport that involves drifting or paddling down a river with a group of people being guided by a trained guide. You will travel in groups in rafts, joining forces with a group of people, together working as a team to navigate the way down the river.

28. Yachting

A sailboat or motorboat used for recreation. Most yachts are privately owned and big enough to contain a cabin, but even small, cabin-less dinghies are sometimes described as yachts.

29. Cave Diving

Cave diving is underwater diving in water-filled caves. Combining the claustrophobic subterranean thrills of caving, and the perilous aquatic environment of diving, cave diving is one of the more dangerous forms of exploration on the planet. In addition to the threat of running out of air, the chances of getting disoriented and lost in an underwater cave are high for those without the proper training.

30. Ice Diving

If extreme, unusual and challenging scuba diving scenarios appeal to you, try diving under the ice. Ice diving is a type of penetration diving where the dive takes place under ice.
The chance to see penguins and leopard seals underwater comes to mind, but the Arctic isn’t the only place for ice diving. Much of the Northern, and some of the Southern, Hemisphere experiences below-freezing temperatures each year, so marine and freshwater bodies could be partially or completely covered in ice and snow. Under wintertime conditions, cold-blooded aquatic animals slow their metabolisms dramatically, meaning they don’t move if they don’t have to. As long as a diver swims calmly, he or she can approach fish and invertebrates within unusually short distances.

31. Powerboating

If you love speed and racing, then this is a sport for you. These powerboats reach speeds high enough to get your adrenaline pumping and enjoy the thrills of a race. Powerboating is a fun and enjoyable ride. Also, called as Motorboating or Speed Boating.

32. Snorkeling

Snorkeling is swimming on the surface or through water with a diving mask, fins, and a hollow tube called a snorkel (a pipe that helps you breathe underwater).

33. Spearfishing

Spearfishing combines the thrill of the hunt with swimming in the ocean and eating healthy, tasty fish. It may be done using free-diving, snorkelling, or scuba diving techniques.

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